Wellness Blog

Posts for: June, 2018

SPORTS INJURIES, ACCIDENTS, and tooth decay are just a few of the reasons we might lose a tooth.  Thanks to modern dentistry, however, we do not need to settle for having a gap in our smiles for the rest of our lives.  There are a few ways to fill that gap, and one of them is with dental implants.
 

Implants Or False Teeth?

Partial and full dentures have been a common solution for missing teeth for many years, but they have their disadvantages.  They are prone to slipping and falling out if not properly secured, and they can lead to jaw pain and soreness in the gums.  They also do not stimulate the jaw bones, so patients with dentures tend to suffer bone loss.

Implants, on the other hand, are metal posts surgically placed in the jawbone under the gums and are basically a new root for a replacement tooth that looks and acts like a natural tooth.  The only advantage dentures have over implants is that they are cheaper.  It is important to fill in the gap with an implant as soon as possible so the bone does not erode and the surrounding teeth do not collapse into the hole, causing alignment and bite issues.

Types Of Implants

The health of the underlying jaw bone will determine a patient’s eligibility for implants and which type they will receive.  In a patient with healthy bone, an endosteal implant will be used.  This is simply a titanium post surgically placed into the jawbone.  After a healing period, the patient will have a second appointment, at which a crown is placed on top of the post.

For patients with bone that cannot support an endosteal implant (or patients who do not want the surgery involved with them), there are subperiosteal implants.  Instead of a titanium post, a metal frame is placed under the gums but on top of the jawbone.  Posts are then added to this framework, and they protrude from the gum line like endosteal implants so that crowns can be attached.

Implants And Braces?

In most cases where a patient needs orthodontic treatment as well as implants, the braces come first, because once an implant is in the jaw, it will not move.  On rare occasions, if the braces only need to shift the front teeth and the missing teeth are located in the back, the implant can be placed before or during orthodontic treatment.

Come Talk To Us About Implants!

Getting dental implants is nothing to be worried about!  3,000,000 people in the United States alone have at least one dental implant, and that number continues to grow.  If you need a dental implant, just talk to us!  We will evaluate your situation and develop the perfect plan to get you the smile you deserve.

Keep taking care of those teeth!

 

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.


RAISING A CHILD IS TOUGH work.  There are so many things parents have to teach their children so that they can succeed as they grow older.  Included on that list are good oral health habits that will enable them to keep their teeth healthy and strong for life!
 

Build Good Habits Early

For permanent teeth to be healthy and strong, it is crucial to start building good oral health habits at a very young age.  These habits include brushing their teeth twice a day for two full minutes, scraping their tongues, and flossing daily.  Being consistent with a daily routine will help establish these habits quickly.  Besides, you want to keep their baby teeth healthy so that their adult teeth will come in where they should and have a healthy start!

Tactics For Teaching Oral Hygiene

Children love to imitate what their parents do, and they love proving that they are big boys and girls.  Aside from letting them watch someone brush their teeth, here are a few other ways to help them form good habits:

  • Get them excited!  Talking up good oral health will help them to get excited about starting to brush their own teeth as well as flossing and eating the right foods.
  • Let them choose their own “equipment.”  When they choose their own toothbrush, it will help them take ownership of their oral health, so encourage them to pick out their favorite one!
  • Use examples!  Youtube videos, apps, children’s books, etc. are great examples, aside from brushing yourself, to show your child that having good oral health is fun!
  • Praise their successes.  If they know you are proud of them for brushing their teeth, they will be proud of themselves and be happier to do it.  You might even use a reward system until they get in the habit, like a sticker chart to build up to a prize.

Our Extra Expertise

If your child is still refusing to brush their teeth, or having difficulty grasping the concept of maintaining good oral health, that is okay- every child learns at their own pace.  Just be patient and keep trying.  You can also come to us for help.  We can show them examples, talk to them, try to find out why they are not so interested in brushing, and set up a routine with them!  They will be tooth-brushing pros before you know it.

We look forward to seeing you again!

 

Top image by Flickr user Garry Wiseman used under Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.


EVERY PERSON IS BORN with their own unique smile.  Some smile with all of their teeth, some only show the top row, and some do not show their teeth at all.  Smiles can come in all shapes and sizes and still be genuine.  We can also end up with smiles that look a lot like our family members’ smiles even if we have very different faces.  How does this happen?  What gives our smiles their shapes and makes them shine?
 

The Structure Of A Smile

Part of the way we smile is of course based on our personalities.  Some people laugh easily, while others maintain an unbreakable poker face.  Some people’s smiles light up their whole faces, spreading from ear to ear and changing the shape of their eyes.  Others are less dramatic, even if their smiles are sincere.

Another component is genetics.  We inherit facial features and the shapes of our facial muscles (which control our expressions) from our parents.  We also all have unique teeth, which is why people can be identified by their dental records.  Nobody else has teeth shaped and aligned exactly the way yours are!

The Role Of Oral Health

Essentially, our individual smiles are one part personality, one part genetics, and one part oral health and hygiene.  The color of our teeth plays a big role in the impression our smiles make, as does the health of our gums.

When we know our teeth and gums look good, it makes it easier to unleash our full smiles because we are not worried about how people will react.  Taking good care of your teeth and gums by maintaining good oral health habits like brushing, flossing, and regular dental visits will ensure that your smile always looks its best!

Gummy And Toothy Smiles

In some cases, smiles are either very “gummy” or very “toothy.”  This can happen because of the way our lips pull back over our teeth and gums, which is perfectly normal.  However, some gummy smiles are the result of abnormal eruption of the teeth, leaving an undesirable tooth/gum ratio.

Likewise, some toothy smiles are the result of gum recession, where the jaw bone wears away and the gum tissue draws back, exposing the roots of the teeth.  There are many options for patients with gummy or toothy smiles, including same-day laser treatments, surgical lip repositioning, braces, surgical sculpting of the gum tissues, and gum grafting.

What Can We Do For Your Smile?

If your teeth are stopping you from sharing your smile as much as you want to, come see us.  Whether the problem is overgrown or receding gums, tooth decay, or misalignment, together we can make a plan to get your smile to what you have always wanted it to be!

Make someone’s day by sharing your smile!

 

Top image used under CC0 Public Domain license. Image cropped and modified from original.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.


THERE IS NOTHING WORSE than being in the middle of a social situation and suddenly realizing you have bad breath.  Whether it is a first date or a job interview, having bad breath can steal away a person’s confidence and ruin a wonderful moment.  But why does this happen?
 

How Bad Breath Works

Sometimes bad breath is the temporary result of eating a particularly pungent meal.  Bacteria in our mouths break down leftover food particles, resulting in unpleasant smells.  Simple dental hygiene practices like daily flossing, twice-daily brushing, tongue-cleaning, and chewing sugar-free gum will minimize the bad breath effect of food.  Some people struggle with a more chronic form of bad breath, also called halitosis.  Halitosis can be caused by a variety of factors and is not always easy to get rid of:

  • Tooth decay and gum disease.  Cavities and periodontitis are both caused by the bacteria that produce nasty-smelling chemicals, so poor dental health and halitosis often go hand-in-hand.
  • Medications.  Many medications can cause dry mouth, and dry mouth leads to a host of oral health problems including halitosis because there is not enough saliva to wash away food and neutralize acids.
  • Mouth, nose, and throat infections.  Infections that cause an increase in mucous can also increase the amount of oral bacteria and contribute to bad breath.
  • Tobacco products.  No matter what form it comes in, tobacco leaves smelly chemicals in the mouth and can cause dry mouth.  It also increases the risk of gum disease or oral cancer, which are other causes of bad breath.
  • Pregnancy.  Pregnancy symptoms such as nausea and morning sickness can cause bad breath, as can eating disorders like bulimia.
  • Mouth-breathing.  Breathing through the mouth dries out saliva and leads to all the usual problems of dry mouth, including bad breath.
  • Chronic conditions.  In some cases, bad breath can be linked to conditions that have little to do with your oral hygiene, such as acid reflux, diabetes, or liver or kidney disease.
     

How To Stay Minty Fresh

The first defense against halitosis is your regular oral hygiene habits.  Brushing, flossing, and cleaning the tongue all help get rid of smelly plaque and bacteria lingering in the crevices between and around teeth.  Sugar-free gum and mints are great solutions for when you are on the go (but they are not substitutes for brushing and flossing).  Quitting smoking will also eliminate a major source of bad breath.  If you are in the habit of breathing through your mouth, try to breathe through your nose more.

Come See Us

If you are still struggling with halitosis even when maintaining an impeccable dental hygiene regimen, there is no reason to suffer in silence.  Schedule an appointment with us so that we can discover the cause.  We want to help you stay healthy and confident!

Thank you for being part of our practice family.

 

Top image by Flickr user fiverlocker used under Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.